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Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

The DDC is a federally funded program supported by the by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD), US Department of Health and Human Services, and authorized by the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000, Public Law 106-402 (42 USC 15001), dated October 30, 2000.

ADD ensures that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families participate in the design of and have access to culturally-competent needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination, independence, productivity, and integration and inclusion in all facets of community life.

ADD’s major goal is for grantees to partner with state governments, local communities and the private sector to assist people with developmental disabilities by helping them to reach their maximum potential through increased independence, productivity and integration within the community.

Grants fund activities in eight areas of emphasis:

  • quality assurance;
  • education and early intervention;
  • child care;
  • health;
  • employment;
  • housing;
  • transportation; and
  • recreation activities.

The Developmental Disabilities Grant Programs are comprised of three state-based programs that collaborate with each other as well as with other entities in their respective States. They are:

A fourth program is directed toward national concerns:

Funding

In FY 2010, $187 million is available for the Administration on Developmental Disabilities programs.